Danny Wahlquist Wordpress Blog

November 30, 2014

Chapters 6-8 of Recovering Redemption by Matt Chandler

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 6:53 am

Some favorite quotes from Chapters 6-8 of Recovering Redemption by Matt Chandler

Chapter 6: Turn Here

sanctification isn’t something we lean back on, as much as it’s something we lean into.

Learning to turn right, where we used to turn wrong.

God’s Spirit will increasingly alert you to certain activities and environments of yours, certain habits and hobbies, that—even though they’re not morally wrong—are still personally detrimental to your own heart. And could stand to be euthanized.

there’s often wisdom in mortifying that particular distraction—whatever it is—in order to keep your heart vivacious in following hard after the Lord.

what’s more valuable to you? Watching Saturday Night Live, or preparing your Saturday night heart for Sunday morning worship?

The conflict you’re having is not primarily about them; God is working in this conflict to reveal something about you.

you’ll never cure the disease you’re suffering from by doing X-rays on other people.

if any of us who battle addictions treat only the surface issues—the presenting symptoms—without working to figure out what’s actually spawning the pain from deep down inside, we’re dooming ourselves to what the prophet Jeremiah called “‘peace, peace,’ when there is no peace” (Jer. 6:14).

The cross of Jesus, while definitely meant to include us in the family of God, is also designed to out us as people who desperately need what its forgiveness and power provide.

Chapter 7: The Perfect Storm

Guilt is more about what we do; shame is more about who we are.

when we conduct baptism services, we invite new converts to stand in the water and lay out the reasons for the shame they once bore.

The gospel gives it all. Justification for our guilt. Sanctification for deconstructing our false ideals. Adoption for the red face of our secret shame.

Chapter 8: God Is Great, God Is Good

while “Abba” does connote a level of family intimacy, it sends up more of the idea that “my dad can beat up your dad,”

The bottom line underneath most of our fear and anxiety is that we simply don’t believe—don’t have faith—in the goodness of God.

But I can tell you from personal experience that one of the most merciful acts of God in my life has come from showing me that really—really, Matt?—there’s nothing I can do but trust Him.

November 27, 2014

Chapter 4: Struggling Well of Recovering Redemption by Matt Chandler

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 7:41 am

Some favorite quotes from Chapter 4: Struggling Well of Recovering Redemption by Matt Chandler

The ongoing response of a Christian to the gospel is a steady stream of ongoing repentance.

He has given us, by saving us, a heart that desires to turn back to Him . . . when we sin.

But sin can’t be trained; sin must be killed. It won’t ever just wet on the paper; it’ll always end up trashing the whole house. The only way to change it is to get rid of it, not go around cleaning up after it or trying to teach it how to mind you. Sorrow comes from treating sin lightly; change comes from taking sin seriously.

The goal of Christian living is not to get past the point of needing to repent, but to realize that God has made us capable through Christ of doing repentance well—repentance that the Bible calls “godly” in nature—what the apostle Paul described as “repentance leading to a knowledge of the truth” (2 Tim. 2:25)—repentance that leads to real change. At the root level. Where it can grow us up into character and consistency and confidence in Jesus’ power and strength, fully at work in our pitiful weakness.

You have no shot at experiencing real change in life if you’re habitually protecting your image, hyping your spiritual brand, and putting out the vibe that you’re a lot more unfazed by temptation than the reality you know and live would suggest.

November 22, 2014

Chapter 3: Full Recovery from Recovering Redemption by Matt Chandler

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 7:47 am

from Chapter 3: Full Recovery

“we’re not seeking God to get a sticker from Him or an attaboy. We’re seeking Him to enjoy even greater intimacy with Him, to get even closer to His heart, to open more and more of those inner closets where we’ve tried to restrict access to Him, thinking He wouldn’t like what He sees, thinking He might reject us if He knew.”

“The reason why we study His Word, why we attack our sin, why we share generously from our resources, and why we serve the people around us is not to persuade Him to love us. We do these things because He already does love us . . . and because He wants us to dig even deeper into the treasury of His blessing, into the joy and sweetness and abundant living His gospel unlocks for us.”

from Recovering Redemption by Matt Chandler

November 9, 2014

Chapters 16-20 from What’s Best Next by Matt Perman

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 5:41 pm

Part 5 Reduce: Free Up Your Time for What’s Most Important

Learning how to cope with not getting everything done is just as important as getting more done. — Stuart Levine, Cut to the Chase

Chapter 16 The Problem With Full System Utilization

Researchers have found that whenever most systems — such as airports, freeways, and other such things — exceed about 90 percent capacity, efficiency drops massively. Not just slightly, but massively.

Chapter 17 The Art of Making Time

There are four main ways to reduce the amount of things you have to do: 1. Delegate 2. Eliminate 3. Automate 4. Defer (DEAD)

Chapter 18 Harnessing the Time Killers

Dave Crenshaw’s The Myth of Multitasking. He points out that we need to distinguish multitasking, switchtasking, and background tasking.

Here’s how Eugene Greissman puts it in Time Tactics of Very Successful People: “Energy is essential for good work. Highly creative people use various kinds of tactics to get their energy level up and keep it up. Delay is one such tactic. Coming face-to-face with a deadline you’re not ready for can set the heart to pumping, the adrenalin flowing. . . . I have seen some students thrive on procrastination. Just be aware that those who live on the edge of a cliff can sometimes fall off.

create chunks of time when you avoid, rather than just minimize, interruptions and then embrace them during defined periods.

while we should seek to minimize interruptions, they can be opportunities to do good for others and be of use.

MIT study showing that employees with the most extensive personal online networks were 7 percent more productive than their colleagues, and those with the most cohesive face-to-face networks were 30 percent more productive.

Part 6 Execute: Do What’s Most Important

If there is any one “secret” of effectiveness, it is concentration. Effective executives do first things first and they do one thing at a time. — Peter Drucker

  1. Plan. Define your priorities for the week so your direction is clear and you aren’t tossed to and fro by everything that comes your way.
  2. Organize. As new input — reference material, action items, projects, steps to take on your projects, and so forth — comes your way, know how to slot what you can’t do immediately into the right places so you can get it done at the right time.
  3. Do. This is where the rubber meets the road. Execute your priorities and take action, doing this in accord with your overall mission, aims, roles, and goals so that you don’t just get things done, but get the right things done.

Chapter 19 Weekly Planning

There are three steps to a solid, easy-to-do weekly review: 1. Pray and review your mission and vision. 2. Define your priorities for the week. 3. Organize your priorities in a way that makes them easy to do.

Begin your weekly planning as a time of prayer, asking God to help you identify what’s most important, and as you make your plans, ask God to work for his glory on your behalf in those things.

  1. Reflect. What do I need to do this week?  What would I like to do this week?
  2. Review your roles and goals.
  3. Review your project and action lists.
  4. Review your calendar.
  5. Get creative about doing good.

Plan your next three months as well. Just list the three to four primary things, in work and life, that you want to accomplish for the quarter. Then keep these before you when you do your weekly planning.

Chapter 20 Managing Email and Workflow

Here are three ways to get people to send you less email: 1. Send less email yourself. 2. Send better emails. 3. Use meetings effectively.

David Allen is right that “one of the best tricks for enhancing your personal productivity is having organizing tools that you love to use.

Chapter 14 & 15 from What’s Best Next by Matt Perman

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 4:14 pm

Chapter 14 Setting Up Your Week

You tame time through a routine — knowing what’s around the corner, and knowing how much time you have to do it. Not all of your time is routine, but enough needs to be to create a framework. — Bradley Blakeman

  1. People work best from routines, not lists (or, be like George Washington).

The secret, which I mentioned earlier, is thinking of your time a bit more like space. When many tasks come up all at once, you don’t have to jam them into your week or add them all to your general actions list. Instead, you assign them to your various activity zones. Ideally, every task will have a general slot in your time map.

You tame time through a routine — knowing what’s around the corner, and knowing how much time you have to do it. Not all of your time is routine, but enough needs to be to create a framework.

Chapter 15 Creating the Right Routines

  1. People work best from routines, not lists (or, be like George Washington).

The secret, which I mentioned earlier, is thinking of your time a bit more like space. When many tasks come up all at once, you don’t have to jam them into your week or add them all to your general actions list. Instead, you assign them to your various activity zones. Ideally, every task will have a general slot in your time map.

You tame time through a routine — knowing what’s around the corner, and knowing how much time you have to do it. Not all of your time is routine, but enough needs to be to create a framework.

Don’t just leave working in your strengths at the level of theory; you need to intentionally build time into your daily routine to do the activities that you do best and that energize you. The daily workflow routine provides an opportunity to do this.

A daily workflow routine like this is the only way that I know of to keep current, and it is highly efficient — if you do it in one uninterrupted block. And that’s exactly why it’s so important to get up early.

There are six routines that are the most helpful for getting things done and staying up to date: getting up early, daily workflow, weekly workflow, prayer and Scripture, reading and development, and rest.

Chapter 12 Finding Your Calling from What’s Best Next by Matt Perman

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 8:06 am

instead of creating a detailed plan, create a more general plan and then advance your goal by keeping your eyes open to seize unplanned opportunities.

Spurgeon has said, “If you stop and do nothing until you can do everything, you will remain useless.”

Don’t take a step you are not going to enjoy simply because you think it will open up a door to something you do enjoy. It seldom works this way.

Some of my best decisions are decisions I made because they enabled me to join forces with quality people who love the Lord, whom I respect, and who make me a better person.

Put yourself in the path of surprise and unplanned opportunities, and then seize them.

read biographies and books that encourage you to do hard things and dream big dreams for God and the good of the world.

As with all planning, involve God and make him the center (Prov. 16:3).

Stephen Nichol, Heaven on Earth: Capturing Jonathan Edwards’s Vision of Living in Between

Chapter 11 What’s Your Mission? How Not to Waste Your Life from What’s Best Next by Matt Perman

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 7:53 am

Part 3 Define

John Piper captures this well: “Whatever you do, find the God-centered, Christ exalting, Bible-saturated passion of your life, and find your way to say it and live for it and die for it. And you will make a difference that lasts. You will not waste your life.”

There are four components to the first step in this process, “define”:

  1. Mission: Develop a personal mission statement.
  2. Vision: Know your overarching life calling, or life goal, and how it differs from your mission.
  3. Roles: Know the specific everyday callings in your life.
  4. Goals: Know how to create change at quarterly, yearly, and multiyear increments.2

Chapter 11 What’s Your Mission? How Not to Waste Your Life

Think of the worst possible situation you could be in. Your mission statement is a good one if it is able to help you then, in those circumstances.

William Wilberforce as an example: Mission: Glorify God and enjoy him forever. Life Goal: Bring an end to the slave trade.

The purpose of life is to know God, enjoy God, reflect his glory back to him by pursuing justice and mercy in all things, and do this in community with others through Jesus Christ.

There is an objective purpose to your life that you did not set. Your mission is discovered, not chosen.

we start by looking explicitly at what the Bible says about the purpose of our lives first, and only then doing an exercise like writing our obituary.

The purpose of life is to know God, enjoy God, reflect his glory back to him, and do this in community with others through Jesus Christ.

If you only capture your purpose, you are in the realm of law and will live a law-based rather than gospel-based life. That’s why, in addition to our core purpose and core principles, a mission statement also includes the third component of core beliefs.

Doing justice means not just being fair and honest in all your dealings but using any influence and ability you have on behalf of those in need.

Gladly pursuing justice and mercy, in fellowship with God, is at the essence of our life purpose. It is the supreme display, you could say, of knowing God, and the chief means by which we glorify him.

there are three main components to a good mission: 1. Core purpose 2. Core principles 3. Core beliefs

The ultimate foundation of your mission is not your character or even correct principles. It’s what God has done for you in Christ and the fact that, if you believe in Christ, God is now your Father

Core Purpose To do all the good I possibly can, for as many people as I possibly can, as often as I possibly can, in all spheres of life, regardless of whatever difficulties I meet with, and to do this to the glory of God through Jesus Christ

November 8, 2014

Chapter 10 The Core Principle for Making Yourself Effective from What’s Best Next by Matt Perman

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 5:47 am

Chapter 10 The Core Principle for Making Yourself Effective

The overarching, guiding principle for our lives is love. Putting the other person first equals maximum productivity.

Rick Warren: “The secret of effectiveness is to know what really counts, then do what really counts, and not worry about the rest.”

Peter Drucker: “If there is any one ‘secret’ of effectiveness, it is concentration. Effective executives do first things first and they do one thing at a time.”

Stephen Covey: “The key . . . is not to prioritize your schedule, but to schedule your priorities.”

Decide what really matters and do it. Seth Godin on the Essence of Productivity and Avoiding “Productivity Whining”

Craig Groeschel, pastor of Life Church in Oklahoma City, one of the most important things is having the courage to say no to those things that are often good, but not dead-on mission.

there are actually two core principles here. “Know what’s most important” is the first one, and “put it first” is the second one.

“Know what’s most important” is the arena of personal leadership; “put it first and actually do it” is the arena of personal management.

The six horizons are:

Personal Leadership

1 50,000 feet: Mission and values

2 40,000 feet: Vision (or life goal)

3 30,000 feet: Long-term goals

4 20,000 feet: Roles

Personal Management

5 10,000 feet: Projects

6 Runway: Next actions and calendar • Supporting systems: Contacts, checklists, journals, and files

the levels of mission and values, vision, long-term goals, and roles are matters of personal leadership. The levels of projects and next actions are matters of personal management.

Scott Berkun says about projects in The Art of Project Management: “More often than not, I’ve found that obsessing on process is a warning sign of leadership trouble: it can be an attempt to offload the natural challenges and responsibilities that managers face into a system of procedures and bureaucracies that cloud the need for real thought and action [emphasis added]. Perhaps even more devastating to a team is that methodology fixation can be a signal of what is truly important to the organization.”

The discipline of personal productivity, then, is the process by which we do this — that is, the process of taking our talents, abilities, and opportunities and making them useful for the good of others, the glory of God, and our joy.

DARE

  1. Define: Know your mission, vision, and roles.
  2. Architect: Weave these things into your life through a flexible schedule.
  3. Reduce: Get rid of the things that don’t fit.
  4. Execute: Make things happen every day.

Conveniently, these form the acronym DARE, which reminds us of the motive and guiding principle that is to lie behind all that we do: seek the benefit of others in all things, to the glory of God,

November 2, 2014

More Favorite Quotes from What’s Best Next by Matt Perman

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 8:24 am

Introduction

Every Christian must be fully Christian by bringing God into his whole life, not merely into some spiritual realm. — Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Isaiah 32:8 says that “he who is noble plans noble things, and on noble things he stands.”

Julie Morgenstern notes, “Workers who can consistently decide with clarity and ease which tasks are most important when under pressure are the most prized in every organization.

The two linchpins of my system were David Allen’s Getting Things Done and Stephen Covey’s First Things First.

To be a gospel-driven Christian means to be on the lookout to do good for others to the glory of God, in all areas of life, and to do this with creativity and competence.

the chief guiding principle for being productive is actually love.

Generosity is at the heart of true productivity in all areas of life.

Structure your life by living your life mainly from a flexible routine, not a set of lists.

You need to know what’s most important (define), weave it into your life (architect), and then get rid of the rest (reduce).

we should have a sense of adventure in doing good. That is, we should be radical and risky and creative and abundant in using our effectiveness to make life better for others.

Part 1 First Things First

Chapter 1 Why Is It So Hard to Get Things Done?

Chapter 2 Why Efficiency Is Not the Answer

Chapter 3 Why We Need to Be Goid-Centered in Our Productivity

we need to go beyond being principle-centered to being God-centered.

The most important reality in the universe is not a set of principles, but a person. As a result, our aim becomes not simply to value certain truths but to please, honor, and love God.

Chapter 4 Does God Care about Getting Things Done?

Aimless, unproductive Christians contradict the creative, purposeful, powerful, merciful God we love. — John Piper

Passion is a far better prioritizer than any productivity system. Soul refreshment comes from seeing glory, not getting stuff done.”

Leland Ryken, Redeeming the Time: A Christian Approach to Work and Leisure

Part 2 Gospel-Driven Productivity

THE FUNDAMENTAL TRUTH behind this book is that the gospel changes everything.

Chapter 5 Why the Things You Do Every Day Matter

The entire purpose of our lives — what God wants from us — is to do good for others, to the glory of God.

we can redefine productivity this way: to be productive is to be fruitful in good works.

John Wesley said, “Do all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, in all the places you can, at all the times you can, to all the people you can, as long as you ever can.”

Wilberforce puts this: “You are everywhere commanded to be tender and sympathetic, diligent and useful.”

What is a good work? Anything that does good and is done in faith.

Chapter 6 Put Others First: Love as the Guiding Principle for All of Life

generosity is to be the guiding principle for our lives.

Love is the guiding principle of the Christian life, and generosity is the chief way love manifests itself

The good of others is “what’s best next.”

Radical generosity, not self-protection, is the Christian ethic (Matt. 5:42;

“How do I demonstrate in my own life God’s radical, abounding love for me?”

we need to be creative because God is not simply a God of utility but also is a God of beauty.

Keith Ferrazzi’s book Never Eat Alone is the second book that really drove this point home to me. Never Eat Alone is by far the best book on networking out there

shoddy work is not simply shoddy work — it is a failure of love.

Excellence at work chiefly manifests itself in two ways: caring about usability and caring about good design.

The chief guiding principle of effectiveness is to put the other person first in all that you do, including your work.

Am I desiring and seeking the temporal and eternal good of my neighbor with the same zeal, ingenuity and perseverance that I seek my own? — John Piper

Chapter 7 How the Gospel Makes Us Productive

The more a person counts as loss his own righteousness and lays hold by faith of the righteousness of Christ, the more he will be motivated to live and work for Christ. — Jerry Bridges, The Gospel for Real Life

embracing the truth that God accepts us apart from good works is the precise thing that causes us to excel in good works.

Doctrine matters for all of us because sound doctrine is at the heart of a life fully committed to Jesus.

Chapter 8 Peace of Mind without Having Everything under Control

Chapter 9 The Role of Prayer and Scripture in Our Productivity

Toby Mac captures this in his song “Lose My Soul,” in which he bemoans the fact that so many in America preach prosperity whereas “the first thing to prosper should be inside of me.”

Wisdom and love — that is, character — are at the root of how we make good decisions.

Discernment based on love is the way to know what’s best.

The essence of character is walking with God.

Rick Warren captures this well: “Thinking of others is at the heart of Christlikeness and the best evidence of spiritual growth. This kind of thinking is unnatural, counter-cultural, rare, and difficult.”

October 12, 2014

Some favorite quotes from Introduction to What’s Best Next by Matt Perman

Filed under: Uncategorized — dannywahlquist @ 7:57 am

Every Christian must be fully Christian by bringing God into his whole life, not merely into some spiritual realm. — Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Isaiah 32:8 says that “he who is noble plans noble things, and on noble things he stands.”

Julie Morgenstern notes, “Workers who can consistently decide with clarity and ease which tasks are most important when under pressure are the most prized in every organization.

The two linchpins of my system were David Allen’s Getting Things Done and Stephen Covey’s First Things First.

To be a gospel-driven Christian means to be on the lookout to do good for others to the glory of God, in all areas of life, and to do this with creativity and competence.

the chief guiding principle for being productive is actually love.

Generosity is at the heart of true productivity in all areas of life.

Structure your life by living your life mainly from a flexible routine, not a set of lists.

You need to know what’s most important (define), weave it into your life (architect), and then get rid of the rest (reduce).

we should have a sense of adventure in doing good. That is, we should be radical and risky and creative and abundant in using our effectiveness to make life better for others.

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.